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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  September 28, 2009 2:20am-4:30am EDT

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n the skin and find life threatening threatening lesions. what's more, in clinical trials melaform reduc elaform reduced unnecessary biopsies 90%, a huge benefit for patients lik patients like kim hunt who has already had melanoma. >> any >> anything that will be able to help my doctor mor help my doctor more accurately detect mel n detect mel nomar, i would be the firs first in line. >> the need for r so g need for more reliable n ha cancer so great the food and drug administration has put the device on a fast track review with a decision expected in the next six months. a potenti
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a potential new way to save lives but re lives but removing much of the guesswork identifying melanomas. >> encouraging news >> encouraging news for all of us who stare at the l us who stare at the little spots on our skin worried about what do i turn into. >> we have a sad passing to tell you you about this morning. william sapphire h william sapphire has died. >> he'll always be remembered for his way with words. here's dan here's dan harris. >> reporte >> reporter: sapphire did not ull his punches, calling hillary clinton hellary clinton a congenital as a he began his career as a speech writer for richard nixon. his targets his targets were on the left but he also he also took aim at george bush. his kol nguage" >> "on language" made him the unofficial arbiter of wh unofficial arbiter of what's hopefully?y. >> what about hopefully? >> i'm for hopefully. >> but it should be it is to be
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hold. ou know >> how many do you know that say it is to be hoped? hopefully as >> i'm all for hopefully as cll. >> very well-known columnist losing his bat losing his battle with pancreatic cancer. we'll be right back. assistance getting around their homes. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little to no cost to you. stay tuned for this important medicare benefit information and free scooter guarantee. imagine... one scooter or power chair that could improve your may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen ... your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. why should you call the scooter store today? because their mobility experts are also medicare experts. and that means the scooter store is your best shot at
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>> it is insomniac theater time. i was on vacation even from watching the movies. so that means it's all vinita. >> what a charmed life when your vacation means you can't watch a movie.
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>> i did see "surrogates." if you've seen the commercials, it's a movie with a ereally great premise. it's the future and we live in a world where people never leave home. instead we live through surrogates, which are essentially better looking versions of ourselves that can never be hurt, they can never get sick, they can never die. so part of the setup of this movie is that the world is really rocked because a person's surrogate dies and instead of the game sort of ending for that day, the person who is controlling the surrogate ends up dying. so bruce willis who is a detective in the movie goes out searching for what might have happened. >> robotic surrogates commonwealth binhs the did your ability with the grace and beauty of the human form to make your life safer and better. >> do you have any idea how a sur got's head exploded from the inside? >> what did the operator say? >> not much. they're dead. >> if you're trying to infer a
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link between -- >> i'm not implying anything. i just want to know how an operator can be killed by signals from a surrogate. >> as a detective, bruce willis and the blond woman you saw there in that scene sort of go out searching for what exactly is going on. it leads to a series of great chase scenes. it really has a lot of great c.g.i.s. the movie has a loss of action you kwant to see. there's one great car scene that involves his partner in the movie. i'm trying not to ruin too much because this movie revolves a lot on the plot and not ruining it. >> i want you to look for access codes. >> good job, eight grier. >> this is agent peters. i found grier. he's been in an accident at market and hanover. >> there are a lot of futuristic elements of this movie that are
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never really explained. i think part it have is because it was developed from a comic book. i think three kernels. i would say kind of worth seeing at the theater. >> i saw a bald bruce willis and one with hair. >> that's his surrogate.
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>> nuclear >> nuclear nuisance. iran thumbs its nose at the west, this time test firing medium range missiles, a threat to the international community. >> then under arrest. a look back at the case against acclaimed filmmaker roman polanski. >> and ladies night. the latest play by major league baseball to hit a home run with female fans. >> i always say that behind every man is a woman and her checkbook. >> it's monday, september 28 put
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them to the test ? >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> there's no yoga in baseball. >> there's apparently yoga and knitting. >> they say women make up like 45% of baseball fans now. >> we like to buy stuff, too. >> i guess so. they're trying to appeal to women. good morning, i'm jeremy hubbard. >> i'm vinita nair. things could get off to a rocky start as diplomats from the u.s. and iran get ready for their first meetings in 30 years this week. >> iran has set the stage by test firing short-range missiles over the weekend and medium-range missiles earlier today. >> reporter: the elite revolutionary guard said they tested a multiple missile launcher and plan maneuvers with lang range missiles that can reach u.s. military bases in the persian gulf. i think it will have very bad consequences for the iranian people. >> reporter: in israel on the
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somber weekend yom kippur, iran's war games take on special significance temperature the deputy fornz call for more sanctions on iran saying the missile tests were a huge challenge to the international community. iran's show of force comes at an already tense time. on friday western laersd accused iran of hiding a new nuclear facility hours outside of tehran. they've long suspected iran of pursuing a nuclear weapon. >> it's no wonder world leaders think they have ulterior motives. otherwise why would they do all this in such a deceptive manner?^ >> reporter: secretary gates said iran is still years away from a nuclear bomb and a military strike on the islamic republic would on buy some time. iran, europe and u.s. meet for nuclear talks this week but in today's political climate, analysts predict no
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breakthroughs. >> it took 31 years but u.s. authorities finally have their man. film make are roman polanski is in a swiss jail this morning. he's been on the lam ever since being arrested for having sex with an undergauge girl. alex joins us this morning from zurich. >> reporter: good morning. roman polanski arrived here saturday to receive a lifetime achievement award from the zurich film festival and instead was detained on a u.s. warrant issued in 1978 after having pled guilty to having sexual relations with a 13-year-old girl. he's lived in france for the past three decades and avoiding countries that have extradition agreements with the u.s. this time around the film festival promoted polanski's appearance so they were ready. the swiss minister of justice said, quote, it's the rule of law and everybody is treated the
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same way, whether it's an ordinary citizen or famous personality. it's purely a legal matter. polanski is a french and polish citizen. officials in both governments have called for his release. polanski's lawyer said he'll try to get the arrest warrant listed. in the meantime his 76-year-old client remains in custody pending legal proceedings and a possible extradition to the united states. >> well, the white house isnd enormous pressure to revise its war strategy in afghanistan, specifically whether to send in more u.s. troops. this yier alone more civilians have been killed than in any year since the afghan war began. nick schifrin reports from the southern city of kandahar. >> reporter: since the war began there has never been a deadlier time to be an afghan. a suicide bombing killed five. the insurgency is growing into formerly peaceful parts of the country. abc news interviewed two dozen afghans in the most violent provinces and asked do you think re american troops will bring
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peace? many are afraid more foreign troops means more violence. they will not bring security, they will be insecurity, this man says. all afghans, no matter who they are, hate foreign soldiers. but in many places the insurgency is so strong local officials say they are desperately in need of foreign troops. in kandahar police worry they are losing the battle. everyone is attacked. insurge nts are everywhere. i don't have enough men. across the country we fond con senses on that point. afghans want more of their own security forces. right now there are too few police and they are poorly trained. no matter how many foreign forces come, without having afghan forces, they won't be effective, this police chief says. for troops in afghanistan, most of them say they want more resources in order to do their jobs better and that more troops would mean better protection of
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the population. but right now the population says the u.s. has failed to protect them. until that feeling changes, most afghans doubt that more troops will bring more peace. nick schifrin, abc news, kandahar. >> president obama is back at the white house this morning after weeks on pressing foreign policy issues. challenges on the home front like health care and commit are equal live daunting, which is why former president bill clinton said republicans and other critics should be offering solutions instead of simply slamming the obama agenda. >> it's not really good for the republicans in the country what's going on now. i mean, they may be hurting president obama, they can take his numbers down, they can run his opposition up, but fundamentally he and his team have a positive agenda for america. their agenda seems to be wanting him to fail. and that's not a prescription for a good america. >> former president clinton says he believes more than ever americans are interested in
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seeing positive action from their elected officials. >> all right. well, here's your monday forecast: rain and very strong wind from the great lakes and western new york and pennsylvania. a chance of evening snow in upper michigan. a strong line of thunderstorms from philly to hartford. >> 60s in portland and seattle but boise and salt lake city climbed to 90. a windy 62 in chicago, 70s along most of the east coast, 90 in miami and 91 in new orleans. >> and a chance of snow! >> that really stunned you you, didn't it? >> it's unbelievable. a group of women have just proven the sky is the limit when it comes to fighting breck. >> 181 female sky divers jumped for the cause setting a new world record for women's formation sky diving. they went up in nine planes and took the daring leap at 17,000 feet. >> the event also raised more than $900,000 to battle breast
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cancer. some of the sky divers were cancer survivors themselves. pretty impressive stunts. >> i could never do that given. >> that's right, you did it before. >> i did. it's scary. good for them. we'll be right back. ♪ now i'm free, free falling
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>> the worst flooding manila has seen in 42 years is starting finally to ease up. a relentless tropical storm dumped more than a month worth of rain in the philippines in just 12 hours. at least 86 are dead and dozens missing. emergency crews have managed to rescue thousands of survivors. >> after 31 years as a fugitive of the u.s. justice system, the
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weekend's surprise arrest of film director roman polanski brings a troubled story back into focus. >> a look back in the abc news vault. >> reporter: samantha was 13 years old and excited about becoming an actress. she thought she'd gotten her big break when her mom met famous director roman polanski. these are some of the pictures polanski took that day. they've never been seen before publicly. and you'd hoped the photos might lead to what? >> more jobs. i had done some commercials. i didn't really want to be a model but i thought it would be helpful. >> reporter: it sounds like the beginning of a hollywood fairy tale but during their first shoot young amanda quickly grew weary of polanski. >> reporter: it went fine but then he started to ask me to change in front of him. i didn't have the
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self-confidence to tell my mother and everyone, no, i'm not going to go. >> reporter: it was during that second shoot that polanski's mood and motive clearly changed. >> we did photos, photos with me drinking champagne, he was friendly and then right towards the very end i got a little scary and i realized that, you know, he had some other intentions. then i knew i was not where i should be and i just didn't quite know how to get myself out of there. >> reporter: samantha says polanski sexually assaulted her after giving her a combination of champagne and quaye lewds. >> my sister overheard me telling my ben boyfriend what happened on the phone. so she went in and told my mom. >> reporter: and then -- >> all hell broke loose. polanski was arrested the next day. he says the sex was con sensual. >> how did you resist? >> just by saying, no, you know.
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several times. and then i just kind of gave up on that. >> reporter: for years polanski insisted samantha had agreed to everything that happened that day but several years ago he softened his tone in an interview with abc news. >> i know now it was the right thing to do but there was no premeditation, you know? it was certainly that just happened. >> reporter: but the former prosecutor on the case said the evidence red like a scene from one of polanski's most famous movies. >> in the movie, he applies mia farrell in -- he thank this not only with the champagne they drank but also gave her quaye lewd. when she became affected by the alcohol and drugs, he raped her.
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>> he went to jail for a short time to undergo psychiatric. that's when polanski fled. samantha says his disappearance of easier to deal with than what she faced from the media. >> i just remember it was all my falt. it was like a career move, you know, something. but nothing nice. >> the public was sympathetic to the famed director. after all, this was just a few years after polanski lost his pregnant wife, share tate, in the grizzly manson murders. samantha says the press had a field day at both their expenses. surprisingly she says she opens polanski can someday come back to the u.s. without the threat of a big time sale. i just don't think it was his intention for all this to
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happen. i knew it was just as bad for him as it was for me. if he could, i'm sure he'd go back and wouldn't do it again. >> roman polanski faced an american audience. friends can not extra dit him to the u.s. 000 miles, 16 years in exile from the community where he went from emperor to outcast. one night he had sex with a 13-year-old girl. a day later the director was arrested, accused of rape, despite his protests. >> i think at that time i had a hard time to persuade myself that it was wrong because i don't think anybody was hurt. >> reporter: you don't? >> at that time i said. later on i realized you know, just i was too close to the forest to see the trees. rishgs a brilliant career was
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satered. >> i became a pariah in 24 hours. they dropped my first picture and then i found myself without any money, not even to pay for my defense. >> reporter: polanski was 43 when he sper waded a woman he knew to photograph his 13-year-old daughter for a french men's magazine. first there were topless photos in hot tub. then there was sex. the girl reported that polanski had first supplied her daughter with champagne and quaye lewds. >> i know now that it was not the rate thing to do. but there was no premeditation. >> reporter: the court-appointed psychiatrists all believed polanski was not a sex offend eshs just had a lapse in judgment. but that judge was caught up in
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his new-found difficulty, even though no one else was arguing for more jail time. >> jason: the judges conduct in connection with the sentencing matter was clearly improper. the plea bargain that was arranged was, sharply, no jail time. >> so polanski defied the judge, went to the airport and took the first plane out of the country. >> what i did i did and i never said i didn't do it. i pleaded guilty and i paid for it, you know. i paid my prize. i went to prison and i suffered enough. >> i think some victims rights' advocates would have some real issue. now she's an advocate for polanski saying he suffered enough indeeg at this, doesn't want him to go back to jail. >> it's hard to say he didn't
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resist arrest, he fully cooperated in all this plane. h. he probably did not expect this. even in michael jackson, samson is wearing her own dr
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♪ skinny ♪ skinny, so skinny >> i have a prediction right now. you know how they say the new michael jackson documentary, they said it's only going to be in theaters for a couple of weeks. i predict right here and now they're making that up. the way tickets are selling right now they're going to say, oh, we've extended the run, it will run in theaters a couple of months. this is a line over the weekend when they were getting ready to sell advance screening tickets.
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this is just for a couple screenings before the movie even comes out. look at the number of people that showed up. 3,000 seats gone over the course of just two hours early soon. fans lined up for days. of course you know why, michael jackson, there he is on stage, some of the last vadio taken of him before he died. this is going to open october 28th. but mark my words, i think you'll have plenty of opportunity to see this. they're not going to end that run. >> i hope your prediction is right, otherwise i can't get a ticket to the movie. >> we'll just have to pull some strings. we work at abc, we anchor world news now. >> send us some! so this next story, chalk it up to a slow, skinny day. if you've looked on any web sites, everyone is buzzing with about chloe kardashian and lamar odom. the thing that caught us and
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that we want to talk about today is not this beautiful four course dinner wed be they have, it's the price for the wedding photos. given that setup we just gave you, you probably are wondering how much would photos like this bring in? $300,000 for an exclusive on the sunday nuptials. the interesting thing is that chloe is going to pocket all of it. lamar odom doesn't get in of it. >> he probably doesn't need it. >> probably not. the thing that's interesting is their show is still taping. so keeping up with the card ash i didn't knows is taping. yet still "okay" magazine is going to play exclusive money for exclusive photos. >> i take it you don't want to hear any of details about all this. >> how's this for a first night
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on the job. you're on tv, comedy show, first night premiere on saturday night live and you drop an f bomb. you probably think the next one you'll hear is "you're fired." >> you stood up for yourself, i bleep love you for that. imodium multi-symptom relief
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video and test drive certificate. ...and improve your concentration. tylenol pm quiets the pain and helps you sleep. because the better you sleep, the better you feel. >> here are so >> here are some stories to watch today on abc news: iran is using war games again today as a show of force. state tv announced the test firing of medium range missiles today as tensions with the west escalate. >> the key facto government of honduras has suspended civil liberties there. . >>and jury selection begins today in the trial of two former bear stearns hedge fund managers charged with defrauding
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investors at two mortgage linked funds that later collapsed. >> finally this half hour, major league baseball sees major dollar signs. >> it is looking to cash in by offering female fans a little extra something. here's stephanie cy. >> reporter: raidies day have been a part for over a century. one day it was yoga in the outfield. on another night jean zelasko products a play by play. it's all part of a marketing plan created by the highest ranking woman in major league baseball. >> the main strategy was let's figure out how to ent grate winning into their lives and
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make it your fun. >> reporter: woman make up a bunch more worldcheck. check out all the supposedly female friend live merchandise in the disc shop. drended it, linked, teaching at women's baseball clinics. the star hitter andrethia. it's baseball with benefits for the unofficial. >> i was thinking i refused to be marketed. this would never work on me until i got free stuff. >> we went to witch saw state
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ash great baseball college and she used to date a lot of baseball players. so i know she's a fan and clearly she took a wrong turn. >> she could have had a world series ball player. the bad boys. more news coming up. after
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committed a crime. why did police nab him now? >> then hidden nukes. where could iran be hiding its potential nuclear weapons? >> and why is the h1n1 virus wreaking havoc on the big man on campus? >> i'm the man that stands in the hallway and screams at you to wash your hands like your
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mom. >> it's monday, september 28th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> it's swine flu and not linemen taking players out of the game now. >> it's a reminder you can hear again and again and sometimes i still forget to sneeze into the elbow. thanks for being with us on this monday morning, i'm vinita nair. >> i'm jeremy hubbard. supporters and friends of roman polanski are jumping to his defense this morning, demanding his release from a swiss jail. >> reporter: he's been a fugitive since he fled the u.s. 31 years ago rather than face sentencing for child rape. the big question why now, why switzerland where he visits often and even own as vacation home. good morning, sonia. >> reporter: roman polanski is now in jail and facing a possible extradition back to the u.s. for drugging and raping a 13-year-old just over three decades ago. the arrest on the same day he was to receive a lifetime
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achievement award. instead waiting for him at the airport were the swiss authorities who were tipped off bit los angeles district attorney's office. it is still a mystery as to why this arrest has returned now since leaving the u.s. 31 years ago. he has never step food on american soil and carefully avoided countries where he would be immediately extradited back to the united states. even his victim, now in her 40s, has dropped the charges against him. a legal battle will be put up to fight his extradition back to the u.s. >> surprising arrest for seemingly everyone involved. >> iran continues to ratchet up the tension ahead of diplomatic talks with the u.s. later this
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week. one day after test firing short range missiles, iran has reportedly launched several medium range rockets. this comes after the u.s. revealed a secret nuclear site last week. martha raddatz says this is probably not the on site. >> i talked to an intelligence official and the official says i guarantee there are other sites in iran. now the u.s. may not know where they are, but they may know where they are. what the iranians did a long time ago is decentralize their program. they put different sites, different areas so there was what's called no single point of failure. in other words, if the israelis bombed one site, there would be many more left. >> secretary of defense gates and secretary of state clinton say economic and diplomatic pressure, not military action, have a better chance of getting iran to change its ways. >> but israel has threatened to retaliate against iran with military force if necessary. >> so what kind of response might we expect to see from the
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israeli? we're joined by simon mcgregor wood in our jerusalem bureau. simon, what are you hearing there? >> reporter: good morning. as you'veed expect from the israelis, nothing specific about the military planning but significantly they're make nothing secret this they are planning the military option. they've always said the military option is on the table. as far as today is concerned, they've been looking at the missile tests going on under the authority of the iranian revolutionary guard with great concern for two reasons: it signals iran's continued defiance of the international community and later today they're set to test fire a miss they'll can fly 1,200 miles, far enough to hit israel's cities and u.s. military bases in the gulf. this is a real concern to israel, a deadly combination of the secret iranian nuclear program and ballistic missile. put the two together, you have a
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real exi stengs threat. that was a point benjamin netanyahu made time and again last week during his speech. he sought to folks the world's attention on the dangers of iran. what they'll be looking for this week will be really tough sanctions delivered on the iranians by the p-5 plus one talks, these very important talks that take place in geneva on thursday. the israelis watching those very carefully. >> as you said, another sign of continuing defiance. thanks. >> another international hot spot plaguing the white house, afghanistan. president obama is considering a request from general stanley mcchrystal for more troops and a new strategy on the ground. mcchrystal says the u.s. risks failure if the tide doesn't turn in the next year. >> defense secretary robert gates says trying to close down the detention center at
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guantanamo bay is turning out to be more complicated than first anticipated. he says the january deadline will not be met. >> final election results this morning show german chancellor angela merckel won a second term. the leader of the professional business predemocrats was also a big winner in the parliamentary election. he's expected to be named as merckel's deputy chancellor. >> the worst flooding to hit manila in 42 years is finally starting to ease up. at least 86 people are dead, dozens are ms.^ing. so far emergency crews have managed to rescue thousands of survivors. >> bad news if you're planning to fly during the holidays. you may have to pay more.
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united, delta, united airways are adding fees. ticket prices overall are up to 20% cheaper than last year. >> social security will pay out more than it takes in for the next two years. officials say job losses and baby boomers have put extra demands on the budget. >> here's a look at your monday weather. a very windy day along the great lakes. look for rain and 60 mile-per-hour gusts in chicago, detroit, milwaukee, cleveland and pittsburgh. showers in parts of new england, florida and south texas and high fire danger out west. >> 68 in colorado springs, 7 in albuquerque, much hotter to the north, 90 in boise but cooling down across the midwest.
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>> the pumpkins at the harvest festival was so big, it tipped the scales at more than 1,500 pound. >> the grower insists no special concoctions were used. just a lot of love and a lot of attention. >> we'll be right back. ♪
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>> as i found out the hard way in 7th grade, football is not a sport for the weak. football players are trained to be tough. >> this season teams all across the country are being tackled by the tiniest of opponents, the flu. david kerley has the story. >> reporter: the flu has been picking off football players like a good defensive back. the university of florida won last week but the coach complained the flu slowed his team and ordered vaccinations, prompting a snarky remark from
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his opponents. but nearly everybody, 30 players were sick at stillman college in alabama. in a sport where success is mesh-yard by getting in someone's face, schools are worried the flu could spread fast. but colleges and high schools aren't taking any chances. walk into a locker room and ask players about swine flu, you'll know they've got the message. washing your hands more? >> yeah. >> reporter: now athletic trainers are spending as much time guarding against flu as they are icing knees and taping ankles. so basically you're the nag. >> definitely. i'm the nag. i'm the guy that stands out in the hallway and screams at you for washing your hands like your mom. >> reporter: washing hands, wrieping down coolers, and teaching athletes not to touch
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water bottles with l mouths. everything is washed every day. all this to keep players on the field. cancelling a high school football game doesn't carry any serious ramifications, but in the world of big time college sports, missing a game could mean hundreds of thousands of dollars and a possible bowl appearance. so now coaches aren'ted just talking about blocking and tackling but cleaning and washing. >> if there stuff is clean, generally they're going to be cleaner and we're going to be healthy answered got more guys to play football friday nights. >> reporter: a way to keep the flu at bay and the friday night lights on. >> it certainly seems like people are just a lot more aware right now. i was flying and at the airport i saw they installed permanent hand sanitizers. i think has a nation we've all been sort of alerted. >> i don't think most of us wash
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our hands right, though. don't they say you have to wash for like 20 seconds? >> i count the alphabet. i sing the alphabet while i wash my hands. >> i'll do the alphabet trick. >> thank you for keeping me healthy up here. >> coming up, what the pundits had to say while you were sleeping sunday morning.
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>> two ma >> two major bomb shells in international news dominated the headlines yesterday. first the leak of a confidential report from the top command are in afghanistan calling for a massive troop buildup. >> and second, revelations about a new secret nuclear facility in iran. noundz "this week" with abc news chief washington correspondent george stephanopoulos. >> this was clearly a carefully
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considered strategy. now the president is telling you, he told me last week are that he can't approve general mcchrystal's request until we get the strategy right. why the second thoughts on the strategy? >> i don't think they're second thoughts so much as when he made his decisions at the end of march, he also announced that we would be reviewing the policy and the strategy after the elections. >> he said the tactics, not the strategy. >> i think he clearly felt we would have to reassess where we are after the election. now, in addition to having a flawed election in afghanistan, we now have general mcchrystal's assessment. when the president made his comments at the end of march, his decisions, obviously general mcchrystal was not in place. we now have his assessment. he has found the situation on the ground in afghanistan worse than he anticipated. >> how long is it going to take? >> i think it's a matter of a
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few weeks. people should remember the debate on the bush administration on the surge lasted three months. >> i trust general mcchrystal and general petraeus and admiral mullen. i understand the president has other factors he has to take into consideration. but i would remind you that when we decided to do the surge in iraq, the maliki government was in wore shape. there was no control. the country was in flames, sectarian violence. >> reporter: have you spoken directly to the president about your concerns? >> yesterday. >> does the president get your argument? >> i think the president, as i said, i think he himself a very difficult decision. the base of his party, americans
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are weary. understandably they're wary. it's a very difficult decision for him. but i believe he'll make the right decision. >> announcer: face the nation with bob schieffer. >> let me just put general mcchrystal's report into the broader context because it doesn't stand alone. it is part of a process. and let's look at what we've done during the last nine months under president obama's leadership. we inherited a situation, we didn't reject it out of hand, we didn't accept it out of hand. we engaged in a very thorough review. we reached some critical decisions, including looking at both afghanistan and pakistan together because of course the threat goes back and forth across the borders. we also reaffirmed our commitment to going after al qaeda, to dismantling, defeating them. we believe and we've seen just this week here in new york we believe that al qaeda poses a direct threat to the united
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states, to friends and allies throughout the world. so we are very clear about our mission. our mission is to protect the united states and or friends and allies and go after al qaeda and related extremist groups. general mcchrystal, the new commander, was asked for his assessment. there's other input coming throughout the government that the president will take on board but i think we ought to look at it in context. >> you talked this summer about if diplomacy failed, you called the sanctions crippling sanctions would be in order. what would those be? >> in the last eight months since we've been dealing with north korea on a similar set of issues, we have forced international consensus around very tough sanctions and that's given us some additional information on how to proceed on the iranian front. but this is a very serious matter. the russians have come out with
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a strong statement saying that the burden has now shifted. it has shifted to iran. they have to come to this meeting on october 1st and present convincing evidence as to the purpose of their nuclear program. we don't believe that they can present convincing evidence that it's only for peaceful purposes but we are going to put them to the test on october 1st. >> here's my concern about the next 18 months. we're looking at a trifecta of disaster heres. if iran is not checked, they'll have a nuclear weapon in the next 18 months. if we don't reinforce afghanistan now, the taliban are going to take over part or all of afghanistan and if nato doesn't jump into the fight with both feet, they're going to become a paper tiger. we could have three major disasters that affect our national security for years to come if we use half measures. reject half measures. >> all eyes on iran on the
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sunday morning talk shows and we're just getting word about more missile tests today, the missiles defense analysts say have the capability of reaching israel and u.s. bases in the gulf. >> so they tested short and now they're moving on to the medium range. you hear so much about the sanctions. maybe that is wait to go. >> we shall see. when we come back, a jump on the morning papers.
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>> announcer: "world news now" delivers your "morning papers." >> this is a throwback. remember kid or play? >> yeah. >> take a look at this hair cut. it will remind you of kid and play. this is all his own hair.
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this is a japanese show. we thought the guy's hair was pretty hilarious because we'd never seen anything like that before. people just come up and touch it because it's so unique. it's like a hat. >> it's so inventive. what's he doing with that fire? >> maybe scenting it. it has no news worthiness about it so we liked it. >> since when has that stopped us? by all appearances, 92-year-old jane bostwick is your normal grandma, likes to play bing owes, crochets, has had knee surgery, doesn't walk like she used to. all until you see this. she is going to do what you think she is going to do. she's going sky diving pup up until this, this new hampshire outfit that did it, their oldest client had been a 78-year-old with two hip replacements. this lady has a couple decades
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on her. her kids were worried. they said, look, she's no spring chicken but she went for it. she said i don't know why i got the idea. i must have read it somewhere and said i'm going sky diving. >> isn't the older president bush sky diving? >> hes did on his birthday almost every wreer. >> maybe they should hook up. >> well, he's married you know. >> i didn't mean hook up like that. i meant for a tandem jump. >> are you guys ready this morning to see the word's saddest dog? take a look. his name is mr. newman. he has a cute little sweater on. they titled the pictures on flicker tough days for mr. newman. despite the cool they had threads, the girls just aren't interested in him anymore. people just seem to be staring at this picture all day long.
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>> hello, newman. let's go from the saddest dog in the world to the happiest. >> aw! >> i can't see that picture enough. how about you? >> look at that little man. the picture of happiness and contentment. a lot making it green is making sure the air in your home is healthy for your family to breathe. make sure you test your home for the presence of radon. it's easy. to learn more, call... preserve your family's health and well-being. get your home tested. now, that's living healthy and green. ♪ green, green, green
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>> act of defiance. iran flexes its nuclear mus bill test launching immediate yaum range missiles. how the. >> act o >> act of defiance. iran flexes its nuclear muscle by test launching medium range missiles. how the u.s. and its allies plan to respond. >> we are going to put them to the test. >> then fugitive capture. filmmaker roman polanski facing extradition to the u.s. on charges he had sex with a minor three decades ago. >> and detecting cancer. the innovative tool that's helping doctors accurately
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diagnose cancer. it's monday, september 28th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> i thought you were going to come back to us with this beautiful, bronze tan. >> i don't tan very well. the freckles connect and it starts to look tan. >> but the bahamas were good? >> it was fun. i went out of blackberry range. >> we missed you. i'm vinita nair. >> i'm jeremy hubbard. the u.s. and iran head toward their first face-to-face meeting in 30 years this week. the u.s. is expected to press
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for blueprints of iran's newly disclosed nuclear site. >> now word comes this morning iran has fired medium range missiles. here's rachel martin in washington. >> reporter: shouts went up as iran conducted a test of short-range missiles. it's a defiant show of force by an iranian regime castigated by the west for building a secret nuclear facility. >> this is part of a pattern of deception and lies on the part of the iranians. >> reporter: western allies say they've known about this secret facility for close to a year but secretary gates wouldn't say if >> well, i'm not going to into that. i would just say that we're watching very closely. >> for the iranians themselves, this must be incredibly unsettling to know western intelligence agencies have penetrated state secrets. >> reporter: iran insists this is part of a peaceful energy program but hasn't explained why the site was hidden and heavily guarded. iran's nuclear ambitions will be top of the agenda when western
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nations hold direct talks with iran in geneva thursday. white house officials say they'll ask for, quote, immediate and unfettered access to the facility. >> we don't believe that they can present convincing evidence that it's only for peaceful purposes but we are going to put them to the test. >> reporter: if tehran doesn't comply, the u.s. will push for sanctions but they need russia and china to make them stick. >> the russians and the chinese are never going to sign on to very biting sanctions but they will turn up the heat incrementally. >> reporter: the wildcard in all of this is israel. prime minister benjamin netanyahu has been urging american lawmakers to take action against iran for defying the international community. israel has said it will not tolerate a nuclear iran but american defense officials say iran very well could become a nuclear power within one to three years. rachel martin, abc news, >> and another foreign policy challenge on the president's plate is the war in afghanistan. the head of central command is
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in washington tomorrow to discuss the worsening situation there. the commander on the ground, general stanley mcchrystal, is asking for more troops but the pentagon says it's going to hold on to that request for now. >> i'm confident that i will have an absolute chance to provide my assessment and to make my recommendations. >> general mcchrystal was very explicit in saying he thinks this assessment, this review that's going on right now, is exactly the right thing to do. he doesn't want it to be open ended or a protracted kind of thing. >> it says that the taliban and al qaeda would see an early pullout as a victory over the united states, much like the humiliating withdrawal by the soviet union back in 1989. >> outrage over the surprise arrest of roman polanski is spreading across europe this morning. he was picked up in switzerland this weekend on charges he fled the u.s. 31 years ago rather than face sentencing for child rape. this morning poland and france say they are planning a joint
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push for polanski's release from a swiss jail. nick watt reports from europe. >> reporter: roman polanski has avoided countries that might extradite him, living a very public life and continuing to make movies. polanski, a french citizen, made his name in hollywood with the acclaimed "rose marie's baby" released in 1968. and his 1974 masterpiece "china town." but three years later he was accused of drugging and raping a 13-year-old girl during a photo shoot. he cut a deal, pled guilty to one of the six charges against him and served 42 days in jail. but polanski believed the judge would renege on that deal. he feared more jail time and fled to france. >> i think at that time i had a hard time to persuade myself that it was wrong because i don't think anybody was hurt. >> reporter: you don't? >> at that time i said. later on i realized, you know, just you know i was too close to the forest to see the trees. >> reporter: he hasn't set foot
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on u.s. soil in 31 years. he was supposed to be receiving an award at the zurich film festival. the los angeles d.a.'s office tipped off swiss authorities that he was on his way and they were here at the airport waiting for him. when polanski got off the plane, he was arrested. last year polanski began a legal battle to have the charges against him dropped. even his victim, now in her 40s, wants his name cleared. >> i knew it was just as bad for him as it was for me. if he could i'm sure he'd go back and he wouldn't do it again. >> reporter: the 76-year-old director is expected to fight extradition to the u.s., hoping to stay out of reach of u.s. justice. nick watt, abc news, zurich. >> in italy, testimony has wrapped up in the murder trial of amanda knox. she and her boyfriend are accused of stabbing her roommate to death during a sex game. both defendants deny the charge. the trial is set to resume next week with closing arguments.
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>> reporter: the yale university doctoral student found murdered on what was to be her wedding day was laid to rest this weekend. friends and family say they'll always remember her for her brilliance and fun-loving spirit. she was buried in california near where she grew up. her co-worker raymond clark is accused of killing le and stuffing her body inside a wall. >> well, michael jackson is still playing to sell out crowds. advance screenings of the new documentary "michael jackson this is it" sold out within two hours over the weekend. fans in l.a. had lined up for three days for a chance to snap up tickets. the documentary opens in wide release on october 28th. we'll review it in insomniac theater, that is if we can get tickets. >> i'm not surprised by that line at all, though, are you? >> i am not. a lot of fans can't wait to see it. i'm among them. >> it's going to be good. >> here's a look at your monday forecast: a wind storm hits all the states
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bordering the great lakes, chicago, detroit, milwaukee, cleveland and pittsburgh. most will see 60 mile-per-hour winds. showers also expected in some of those cities. thunderstorms around miami and south texas and high fire danger out west. >> phoenix gets up to 107, sacramento 85, boise 90, just 54 for fargo, chilly and in the 60s for much of the midwest today. 75 in boston, 80 in new york, 79 in atlanta. summer still holding on in the southwest but the rest of the country looking pretty nice. >> just months ago an unsuspecting fly got the death penalty for landing on president obama. apparently it wasn't enough of a deterrent for bugs around the world. >> this time a spider decided to upstage the pope as he speak at castle in the check republic. the pope didn't even notice as the spider paraded up and down his white robe but he tried to give if a swat when it crawled up the side of his face.
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>> at 82 the hope is obviously not as quick as president obama. >> perhaps it had sinned and needed to be absolved or something. >> we'll be right back with more "world news now." ♪ eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee kruse: if you have a hard time walking and getting around in your house, you need a hoveround power chair. you'll be able to go to the mall... play with the grandkids... visit family and friends... and do all the things you ralways loved to do.
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>> looky here. quarterback michael vick officially back in the game on sunday playing in his first regular season nfl game in three years. he took with the philadelphia eagles for just 11 plays including two incomplete passes. the eagles beat my beloved kansas city chiefs. he was released from prison just two months ago after serving 18 months on dog fighting charges. he said it was a real highlight
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in his career to get back on the field. >> i'm sure he had some nerves after so long. >> it seems every congressional candidate runs for office fighting to clean up washington. >> it seems another loophole opens up. >> chief investigative correspondent brian ross follows the money trail. >> reporter: it's a dream come true, especially if someone else pays for it. it was the case this summer for two powerful members of congress. john boehner and saxby chambliss, the two golf loving republicans spent a luxurious weekend at the greenbriar, the kind of cozy gathering new ethics reform laws were supposed to curb. >> you're seeing the quintessential washington insider pay-to-play game. >> reporter: all paid for with money boehner and chambliss raised supposedly to support other's campaigns.
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but a loophole allows pacs to be spent for almost any purpose, including golf. in the 2008 election cycle, chambliss spent more money on golf outings, $225,000, than he gave to political campaigns, $204,000. the senator did not want to talk bus his leadership pac. in a statement chambliss says he holds the golf outings only as a way to raise money. ethics watch dog groups question that. >> i call it a political slush fund. itgives the recipient, the member of congress, a chance to live a lifestyle he or she otherwise would not be able to afford. >> reporter: in a joint investigation with the independent group propublica, abc news found members of congress used leadership pacs to pay for ski trips, casino, disney world and the super bowl. senate majority leader harry reid used leadership pac money
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to throw a $39,000 inaugural party and john edwards used leadership pac money to pay his mistress $114,000 to produce a series of videos. we found there are some 400 members of congress who have opened their on leadership pacs. with no limit on how they can spend their money, it's no surprise there's been no talk on capitol hill to change anything about it. >> still ahead, the experimental technology that's nearly perfect in detecting fatal skin cancers. >> see how it works when we come back.
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a major medical mixup has become both a miracle and nightmare for two families. one woman was mistakenly implanted at a fertility clinic with an embryo that wasn't hers. >> she's given birth to a baby boy and has decided to give the baby up to his genetic parents. >> reporter: a guardian angel is what karen is being called. this past thursday she gave birth to a five pound baby boy that wasn't hers, the result of
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a fertility clinic implanting the wrong embryo into her womb. >> we're going to have to turn away from our loss and focus the gift we're giving. >> reporter: it was the morel's frozen embryo, one they hoped would give them a second child, but not this way. >> to find out your child is in another woman, i didn't know if she was going to terminate, if she was going to carry it. it was terrible. >> reporter: cases like these are exceedingly rare but in the same week a separate ivf clinic in new orleans suspended operations because of a mixup in labeling the embryos of some 100 couples. at least one of them is suing. >> it's been incredibly emotionally taxing for them. there's initially the shock and then comes the fear of where is it? if you can't find mine, does someone else have it. >> reporter: oxner hospital says none of the embryos were
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implanted in the wrong mother. with more than three million babies worldwide that have been born out of avf, dr. jamie griffo says federal regulations for the industry are not the problem, human error is. >> we're in a practice where there is zero tolerance for error. you cannot have an error because it affects so many lives. >> reporter: and it can result in a myriad of thorny ethical and legal issues. in 2004 a california woman wasn't told she'd been carrying another couple's embryo until the baby was ten months old. the case resulted in just custody of the child. for these family, it is a bittersweet ending. >> the doctor brings up a great point in that there really is zero tolerance for error in the
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line of work they're in. most of us would agree it's not that shocking to hear of a case like this. >> to take an unforgivable mistake and turn it into something positive is pretty commendable. i'm not sure most parents could do that. >> next, would could be a breakthrough in detecting the deadly skin cancer melanoma. it's one of the fastest growing cancers. early detection is the key to saving lives. >> now there's a new experimental tool to help doctors find melanoma sooner and with greater accuracy. john mckenzie has the story. >> reporter: it's perhaps the most difficult question a dermatologist has to answer. is it an innocent mole or a potential melanoma that needs to be biopsied? >> studies show that doctors can pick up melanoma accurately only two-thirds of the time. that means we're missing a third of melanomas time we see a patient. >> and the consequence? >> the consequence is lethal. >> reporter: now an experimental defies promises to remove much of the guesswork.
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it's called melafind. it records the patient's skin in different bands of light, including some that look below the skin's surface. it compares the maniage to thousands of other images, both malignant and benign. >> in the clinical trial of over 1,500 patients, the device detected over 98% of the melanomas. that's significantly better than even the best dermatologist. >> the same pattern recognition software that allows a satellite to zoom in and identify enemy targets is now used to hone in on the skin and find life threatening lesions. what's more, in clinical trials melafind reduced unnecessary biopsies 90%, a huge benefit for patients like kim hunt who has already had melanoma. >> anything that will be able to help my doctor more accurately detect a melanoma, i would be the first in line. >> the need for more reliable
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skin cancer detection is so great the food and drug administration has put the device on a fast track review with a decision expected in the next six months. a potential new way to save lives but removing much of the guesswork identifying melanomas. >> encouraging news for all of us who stare at the little spots on our skin worried about what do i turn into. >> we have a sad passing to tell you about this morning. william sapphire has died. >> he'll always be remembered for his way with words. here's dan harris. >> reporter: sapphire did not pull his punches, famously calling hillary clinton a congenital liar. he began his career as a speech writer for richard nixon. his targets were on the left but he also took aim at george w. bush for the treatment of prisoners. his column "on language" made him the unofficial arbiter of what's okay to say. >> what about hopefully?
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>> i'm for hopefully. >> but it should be it is to be hoped. >> how many do you know that say it is to be hoped? very few. >> i'm all for hopefully as well. >> very well-known columnist losing his battle with pancreatic cancer. we'll be right back. assistance getting around their homes. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little to no cost to you. stay tuned for this important medicare benefit information and free scooter guarantee. imagine... one scooter or power chair that could improve your may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen ... your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. why should you call the scooter store today? because their mobility experts are also medicare experts.
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>> it is insomniac theater time. i was on vacation even from watching the movies. so that means it's all vinita. >> what a charmed life when your vacation means you can't watch a movie. >> i know, right? it's not like it's some heavy duty have to go to the movie and
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eat popcorn. >> i did see "surrogates." if you've seen the commercials, it's a movie with a really great premise. it's the future and we live in a world where people never leave home. instead we live through surrogates, which are essentially better looking versions of ourselves that can never be hurt, they can never get sick, they can never die. so part of the setup of this movie is that the world is really rocked because a person's surrogate dies and instead of the game sort of ending for that day, the person who is controlling the surrogate ends up dying. so bruce willis who is a detective in the movie goes out searching for what might have happened. >> robotic surrogates combines the durability of a machine with the grace and beauty of the human form to make your life safer and better. >> do you have any idea how a surrogate's head would explode from the inside? >> what did the operator say? >> not much.
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they're dead. >> if you're trying to imply a link between -- >> i'm not implying anything. i just want to know how an operator can be killed by signals from a surrogate. >> as a detective, bruce willis and the blond woman you saw there in that scene sort of go out searching for what exactly is going on. it leads to a series of great chase scenes. it really has a lot of great c.g.i.s. the movie has a lot of action you want to see. there's one great car scene that involves his partner in the movie. i'm trying not to ruin too much because this movie revolves a lot on the plot and not ruining it. >> i want you to look for access codes. >> good job, agent grier. >> this is agent peters. i found grier. he's been in an accident at market and hanover. >> there are a lot of futuristic elements of this movie that are never really explained.
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i think part of it is because it was developed from a comic book. i think three kernels. i would say kind of worth seeing at the theater. it is kind of cool and keeps you interested but the plot falls apart. >> i saw a bald bruce willis
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>> nuclear nuisance. iran thumbs its nose at the west, this time test firing medium range nuclear missiles, a threat to the international community. >> then under arrest. a look back at the case against acclaimed filmmaker roman polanski. and a rare look through the eyes of his victim. >> and ladies night. the latest play by major league baseball to hit a home run with female fans. >> i always say that behind every man is a woman and her
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checkbook. >> it's monday, september 28th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> there's no yoga in baseball. >> there's apparently yoga and knitting. >> they say women make up like 45% of baseball fans now. >> we like to buy stuff, too. >> i guess so. they're trying to appeal to women. good morning, i'm jeremy hubbard. >> i'm vinita nair. things could get off to a rocky start as diplomats from the u.s. and iran get ready for their first meetings in 30 years this week. >> iran has set the stage by test firing short-range missiles over the weekend and medium-range missiles earlier today. here's our laura satrakian. >> reporter: the elite revolutionary guard said they tested a multiple missile launcher and plan maneuvers with long range missiles that can reach u.s. military bases in the persian gulf.
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>> i think it will have very bad consequences for the iranian people. >> reporter: in israel on the somber weekend of yom kippur, iran's war games take on special significance. the deputy foreign minister calls for more sanctions on iran saying the missile tests were a huge challenge to the international community. iran's show of force comes at an already tense time. on friday western leaders accused iran of hiding a new nuclear facility hours outside of tehran. they've long suspected iran of pursuing a nuclear weapon. >> it's no wonder world leaders think they have ulterior motives. that they have a plan to go forward with nuclear weapons. otherwise why would they do all this in such a deceptive manner? >> reporter: secretary gates said iran is still years away from a nuclear bomb and a military strike on the islamic republic would only buy some time. iran, europe and u.s. meet for nuclear talks this week but in today's political climate, analysts predict no breakthroughs. >> it took 31 years but u.s.
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authorities finally have their man. filmmaker roman polanski is in a swiss jail this morning. he's been on the lam ever since being arrested for having sex with an underage girl. alex joins us this morning from zurich. >> reporter: good morning. roman polanski arrived here at zurich's airport saturday to receive a lifetime achievement award from the zurich film festival and instead was detained on a u.s. warrant issued in 1978 after having pled guilty to having sexual relations with a 13-year-old girl. he's lived in france for the past three decades and avoiding countries that have extradition treaties with the u.s. this time around the film festival promoted polanski's appearance so they were ready. the swiss minister of justice
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said, quote, it's the rule of law and everybody is treated the same way, whether it's an ordinary citizen or famous personality. it's purely a legal matter. polanski is a french and polish citizen. officials in both governments have called for his release. polanski's lawyer said he'll try to get the arrest warrant lifted. in the meantime his 76-year-old client remains in custody pending legal proceedings and a possible extradition to the united states. >> well, the white house is under enormous pressure to revise its war strategy in afghanistan, specifically whether to send in more u.s. troops. this year alone more civilians have been killed than in any year since the afghan war began. nick schifrin reports from the southern city of kandahar. >> reporter: since the war began there has never been a deadlier time to be an afghan. a suicide bombing killed five. the insurgency is growing into formerly peaceful parts of the country. abc news interviewed two dozen afghans in the most violent provinces and asked do you think
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more american troops will bring peace? many are afraid more foreign troops means more violence. they will not bring security, they will be insecurity, this man says. all afghans, no matter who they are, hate foreign soldiers. but in many places the insurgency is so strong local officials say they are desperately in need of foreign troops. in the taliban stronghold of kandahar, police worry they are losing the battle. everyone is attacked. insurgents are everywhere. i don't have enough men. across the country we fond con senses on that point. afghans want more of their own security forces. right now there are too few police and they are poorly trained. no matter how many foreign forces come, without having afghan forces, they won't be effective, this police chief says. for troops in afghanistan, most of them say they want more resources in order to do their jobs better and that more troops
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would mean better protection of the population. but right now the population says the u.s. has failed to protect them. until that feeling changes, most afghans doubt that more troops will bring more peace. nick schifrin, abc news, kandahar. >> president obama is back at the white house this morning after weeks on pressing foreign policy issues. challenges on the home front like health care and the economy are equally daunting, which is why former president bill clinton said republicans and other critics should be offering solutions instead of simply slamming the obama agenda. >> it's not really good for the republicans in the country what's going on now. i mean, they may be hurting president obama, they can take his numbers down, they can run his opposition up, but fundamentally he and his team have a positive agenda for america. their agenda seems to be wanting him to fail.
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and that's not a prescription for a good america. >> former president clinton says he believes more than ever americans are interested in seeing positive action from their elected officials. >> all right. well, here's your monday forecast: rain and very strong wind from the great lakes and western new york and pennsylvania. a chance of evening snow in upper michigan. a strong line of thunderstorms from philly to hartford. red flag fire morning in california, nevada and oregon. >> 60s in portland and seattle but boise and salt lake city climbed to 90. a windy 62 in chicago, 70s along most of the east coast, 90 in miami and 91 in new orleans. >> and a chance of snow! >> that really stunned you, didn't it? >> it's unbelievable. a group of women have just proven the sky is the limit when it comes to fighting breast cancer. >> 181 female sky divers jumped for the cause setting a new world record for women's formation sky diving. they went up in nine planes and took the daring leap at 17,000
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feet. >> the event also raised more than $900,000 to battle breast cancer. some of the sky divers were cancer survivors themselves. pretty impressive stunts. >> i could never do that again. >> that's right, you did it before. >> i did. it's scary. good for them. we'll be right back. ♪ now i'm free, free falling
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>> the worst flooding manila has seen in 42 years is starting finally to ease up. a relentless tropical storm dumped more than a month's worth of rain in the philippines in just 12 hours. at least 86 are dead and dozens missing. emergency crews have managed to rescue thousands of survivors. >> after 31 years as a fugitive
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of the u.s. justice system, the weekend's surprise arrest of film director roman polanski brings a troubled story back into focus. >> a look back in the abc news vault. >> reporter: samantha was 13 years old and excited about becoming an actress. she thought she'd gotten her big break when her mom met famous director roman polanski. he asked to photograph samantha for a magazine. these are some of the pictures polanski took that day. they've never been seen before publicly. and you'd hoped the photos might lead to what? >> more jobs. i had done some commercials. i didn't really want to be a model but i thought it would be helpful. >> reporter: it sounds like the beginning of a hollywood fairy tale but during their first shoot young samantha quickly grew wary of polanski. >> reporter: it went fine but then he started to ask me to change in front of him. i didn't have the
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self-confidence to tell my mother and everyone, no, i'm not going to go. >> reporter: it was during that second shoot that samantha said polanski's mood and motive clearly changed. >> we did photos, photos with me drinking champagne, he was friendly and then right towards the very end i got a little scary and i realized that, you know, he had some other intentions. then i knew i was not where i should be and i just didn't quite know how to get myself out of there. >> reporter: samantha says polanski sexually assaulted her after giving her a combination of champagne and qualudes. >> my sister overheard me telling my boyfriend what happened on the phone. so she went in and told my mom. >> reporter: and then -- >> all hell broke loose. polanski was arrested the next day.
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he says the sex was consensual. >> how did you resist? >> just by saying, no, you know. several times. and then i just kind of gave up on that. >> reporter: for years polanski insisted samantha had agreed to everything that happened that day but several years ago he softened his tone in an interview with abc news. >> i know now it was not right thing to do but there was no premeditation, you know? it was something that just happened. >> reporter: but the former prosecutor on the case said the evidence read like a scene from one of polanski's most famous movies. >> in the movie, he supplies mia
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farrell in -- not only with the champagne they drank but also gave her qualudes. when she became affected by the alcohol and drugs, he raped her. >> he went to jail for a short time to undergo psychiatric. that's when polanski fled. samantha says his disappearance of easier to deal with than what she faced from the media. >> i just remember it was all my fault. it was like a career move, you know, something. but nothing nice. >> the public was sympathetic to the famed director. after all, this was just a few years after polanski lost his pregnant wife, sharon tate, in the grisly manson murders. samantha says the press had a
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field day at both their expenses. surprisingly she says she opens polanski can someday come back to the u.s. without the threat i just don't think it was his intention for all this to happen. i knew it was just as bad for him as it was for me. if he could, i'm sure he'd go back and wouldn't do it again. >> roman polanski faced an american audience. friends cannot extradite him to the u.s. thousands of miles, 16 years in exile from the community where he went from emperor to outcast. one night he had sex with a 13-year-old girl. a day later the director was arrested, accused of rape, despite his protests. >> i think at that time i had a hard time to persuade myself that it was wrong because i don't think anybody was hurt. >> reporter: you don't? >> at that time i said. later on i realized, you know, just i was too close to the forest to see the trees.
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>> reporter: a brilliant career was shattered. >> i became a pariah in 24 hours. they dropped my first picture and then i found myself without any money, not even to pay for my defense. >> reporter: polanski was 43 when he persuaded a woman he knew to let him photograph her 13-year-old daughter for a french money's magazine. first there were topless photos in hot tub. then there was sex. the girl reported that polanski had first supplied her daughter with champagne and qualudes. >> i know now that it was not the right thing to do. but there was no premeditation. it was just something this happened. >> reporter: the court-appointed psychiatrists all believed polanski was not a sex offender, just had a lapse
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in judgment. but that judge was caught up in his new-found publicity, even though no one else was arguing for more jail time. not even the victim or her family or her attorney. >> jason: the judges conduct in connection with the sentencing matter was clearly improper. the plea bargain that was arranged was, sharply, no jail time. >> so polanski defied the judge, went to the airport and took the first plane out of the country. >> what i did i did and i never said i didn't do it. i pleaded guilty and i paid for it, you know. i paid my price. i went to prison and i suffered enough. >> i think some victims rights' advocates would have some real issue with the victim becoming an advocate for polanski, saying he suffered enough indignity, doesn't want
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him to go back to jail. >> it's hard to say he didn't resist arrest, he fully cooperated in all this. he probably did not expect this. even in death michael jackson,
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♪ skinny, so skinny >> i have a prediction right now. you know how they say the new michael jackson documentary, all the footage from his rehearsals, they said it's only going to be in theaters for a couple of weeks. i predict right here and now they're making that up. the way tickets are selling right now they're going to say,
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oh, we've extended the run, it will run in theaters a couple of months. this is a line over the weekend when they were getting ready to sell advance screening tickets. this is just for a couple screenings before the movie even comes out. look at the number of people that showed up. 3,000 seats gone over the course of just two hours early soon. -- sunday. fans lined up for days. of course you know why, michael jackson, there he is on stage, some of the last video taken of him before he died. this is going to open october 28th. but mark my words, i think you'll have plenty of opportunity to see this. they're not going to >> i hope your prediction is right, otherwise i can't get a ticket to the movie. it going to be impossible. >> we'll just have to pull some strings. we work at abc, we anchor world news now. >> send us some! >> don't they know who we are? so this next story, chalk it up to a slow skinny day. if you've looked on any web sites, everyone is buzzing about
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chloe kardashian and lamar odom. the thing that caught us and that we want to talk about today is not this beautiful four course dinner wedding they have, it's the price for the wedding photos. given that setup we just gave you, you probably are wondering how much would photos like this bring in? $300,000 for an exclusive on the sunday nuptials. the interesting thing is that chloe is going to pocket all of it. lamar odom doesn't get any of it. >> he probably doesn't need it. >> probably not. the thing that's interesting is their show is still taping. kardashians is taping. yet still "okay" magazine is going to pay exclusive money for exclusive photos. >> i take it you don't want to hear any of details about all this.
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>> how's this for a first night on the job. you're on tv, comedy show, first night premiere on saturday night live and you drop an f bomb. you probably think the next one you'll hear is "you're fired." apparently that's not the case. jenny is a brand new cast member. listen. >> you stood up for yourself, i [ bleep ] love you for that. imodium multi-symptom relief
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video and test drive certificate. ...and improve your concentration. tylenol pm quiets the pain and helps you sleep. because the better you sleep, the better you feel. >> here are some stories to watch today on abc news: iran is using war games again today as a show of force. state tv announced the test firing of medium range missiles today as tensions with the west escalate. >> the de facto government of honduras has suspended civil liberties there. the country's elected president had called for protests today to mark the throw-month anniversary of his ouster. >> and jury selection begins today in the trial of two former bear stearns hedge fund managers charged with defrauding
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investors at two mortgage linked funds that later collapsed. >> finally this half hour, major league baseball sees major dollar signs. >> it is looking to cash in by offering female fans a little extra something. here's stephanie cy. >> reporter: ladies day have been a part of baseball since the 19th century. today at dodgers stadium ladies bring in the bucks. one day it was yoga in the outfield. on every wednesday jean zelasko projects a play by play. it's all part of a marketing plan created by the highest ranking woman in major league baseball. >> the main strategy was let's figure out how to integrate women into baseball and baseball
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in their lives and make it fun. >> i always say that behind every man is a woman and her checkbook. >> reporter: indeed this initiative seems much less about girl power and much more about purchasing power. just check out all the supposedly female-friendly merchandise in the gift shop. all of it drenched in pink. even the dodgers' top team members are playing ball. teaching at women's baseball clinics. star hitter andre ethier hosted baseball day. >> i said i don't like baseball. who said who cares, we're not here for the baseball game. >> reporter: they left as dodgers fans. >> i was thinking i refused to be marketed. this would never work on me until i got free stuff.
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>> we went to wichita state, a great baseball college and she my wife, used to date a lot of baseball players. so i know she was a big baseball fan. clearly she took a wrong turn. she could have had a world series ball player and instead she stuck with the guy rea
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